December 12, 2017, 06:33:19 AM

Author Topic: Hamburger Disease  (Read 3908 times)

Offline gogators!

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2003
  • Gender: Male
Re: Hamburger Disease
« Reply #60 on: July 17, 2017, 10:26:30 PM »
Just seems strange that this kind of thing only ever seems to get attention/happen at foreign companies.

Remember when it was Mcdonalds fault for the poor pay of part time workers

No, there's plenty of times it involves Korean companies. You just don't notice because it's background noise in Korean. Information selectivity bias.
Examples?
Just watch the Korean News. Heck...
What's making front webpage news right now...
http://media.daum.net/
But that's just noise. Who's really going after those companies?

Offline pkjh

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1215
  • Gender: Male
Re: Hamburger Disease
« Reply #61 on: July 17, 2017, 10:41:49 PM »
Just seems strange that this kind of thing only ever seems to get attention/happen at foreign companies.

Remember when it was Mcdonalds fault for the poor pay of part time workers

No, there's plenty of times it involves Korean companies. You just don't notice because it's background noise in Korean. Information selectivity bias.
Examples?
Just watch the Korean News. Heck...
What's making front webpage news right now...
http://media.daum.net/
But that's just noise. Who's really going after those companies?
Whenever there's another scandal. Lotte was the flavor of the month for the last half of last year.

Anther issue is that the conglomerates are pretty influencial in the media. They have bankrupted, intimidated, and threateened reporters in the recent past. So, the only time you can really nail them is when a scandal erupts, like the macadamien nut thing with Korean Air, or the SK telecom cheif getting a pardon... then reporters have a window to criticise major companies without worry of retribution.

Offline kyndo

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3905
Re: Hamburger Disease
« Reply #62 on: July 18, 2017, 08:52:10 AM »
Impossible, because that's not what a superbug is. a superbug is an antibiotic resistant bacterium.
Even if it was a superbug version of E-coli, it would still need an incubation period for it to become active. Its biologically impossible for antibiotic resistance to change how fast the cells divide.
100% true.

    On the other hand, resistance to antibiotics is almost never a 100% thing. An antibiotic-resistant strain of, say, streptococcus can have partial immunity to antibiotics, which means they would survive a treatment of penicillin, but would multiple at a much lower rate.

   Similarly, I imagine that certain mutations might allow a virus to become more efficient at circumventing the host's natural immune system and allow it to propagate at a much faster rate. This would mean a shorter incubation period, meaning that symptoms would occur earlier.

I seriously doubt that this was the case in this particular instance though.  :undecided: