July 21, 2017, 05:46:00 PM


Author Topic: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.  (Read 4357 times)

Offline pkjh

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #40 on: July 16, 2017, 07:23:56 PM »
Humidity? You call Korea humid? Ha! Try out a summer in Miami and come back and tell me if Korean summer is humid. Or if that's too far, try out Southeast Asia.
I've heard conflicting things about this. One guy from southern Florida thought the humidity was worse here, some other guy said it was the same.

My travels throughout SE Asia during the summer months, made me feel it was the same during the July, and August. During the 2 months, to me at least, the humidity levels felt exactly the same, in Siagon, Bangkok, Singapore, Jakarta, Manila, or Seoul. Basically alway felt hot & gross. It's the rest of the year that differentiates the weather throughtout.

Offline weigookin74

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #41 on: July 16, 2017, 09:12:15 PM »
Humidity? You call Korea humid? Ha! Try out a summer in Miami and come back and tell me if Korean summer is humid. Or if that's too far, try out Southeast Asia.
I've heard conflicting things about this. One guy from southern Florida thought the humidity was worse here, some other guy said it was the same.

My travels throughout SE Asia during the summer months, made me feel it was the same during the July, and August. During the 2 months, to me at least, the humidity levels felt exactly the same, in Siagon, Bangkok, Singapore, Jakarta, Manila, or Seoul. Basically alway felt hot & gross. It's the rest of the year that differentiates the weather throughtout.

Yeah, I've had others tell me that too.  One girl I went to uni with came here with her family last summer and she was shocked over the humidity here.  She's travelling through the south this year for a vacation with her family.  (Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, etc.)  I asked her about it there and she said the heat and humidity felt way worse here.  I was surprised.  I figured they'd be about the same. 

I'm just grateful that 8 months of the year the weather is tolerable here.  I heard from someone in Taiwan, it's hot and humid for 9 months a year.  No thanks.  Yuck.  I guess 2 months of intense pain with a month on each side of hot and semi humid weather is easier to take than that.  Ha ha. 

Offline weigookin74

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #42 on: July 16, 2017, 09:19:22 PM »
my hair is getting GRAY around the ears!

Be careful.. they non-renew people for that.

Time to get the hair dye.

Can Koreans be that picky now?  Market's not as flooded as it once was.  That, being over 35, being bald, being fat, not speaking North American English did get some folks non renewed during the peak of the recession however.  But, I'll guess he's in the clear.  I've got a few coming in.  I'll prob dye.  But, just because I don't want the kids saying hwait-eu hair teacher.   

If you have an Amazon account, just for men can be shipped over here and it'll be cheaper than g market.  I did some research.  If you have really short hair, use the beard dye and go a shade or two lighter than your natural color.  If you have really thick and longer hair, get the regular dye.  Wear goggles to cover your eyes and get some good rubber gloves.  5 minutes soaking, then wash out.  Kind of dark and then fades after a couple of days.  (Very few Koreans in your schools will have natural grey.  So, if you go grey, you'll stick out like a sore thumb.)

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #43 on: July 16, 2017, 10:18:03 PM »
Here's some:

Pessimism - always complaining about shit

Most of that comes from the general powerlessness foreigners feel as outsiders.

Back home one is able to release any tension by directly altering, influencing or interracting with society as an equal part.

If there's one thing that defines the current trend in politics back home, its the belief that people are treated equally, that government reflects and is responsive to their interests, and that the ordinairy person feels that government is "in touch".

Yup you're not equal. You chose to accept that when you moved to another country as a temporary guest worker. It's a GOOD thing you are not equal and have little to no influence. That influence is for the citizens. You're not some citizen of the world who gets to fly to whatever country you please and attempt to influence and disrupt its society simply to suit your whims.

People need to accept inequality when that inequality is a rational and sensible structure.They also need to learn that just because they want to change things, it doesn't always mean they should.

Offline Cyanea

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #44 on: July 17, 2017, 12:29:02 AM »
Can Koreans be that picky now?  Market's not as flooded as it once was. 

That, being over 35, being bald, being fat, not speaking North American English did get some folks non renewed during the peak of the recession however.

I'm just speculating, although I did help my school recruit at one point.

They basically ignored resumes from older guys over 30, so I'm assuming grey hair, baldness might tip the balance away from you, at least in Seoul.

It was quite surreal. There were applications from neatly-dressed men with good qualifications who were probably able to start the next day. There was even an application from a black guy with an Ivy league qualification. Not a second glance.

But my school just chased after flaky females with snotty phone voices who didn't even call back.

Quote
If you have an Amazon account, just for men can be shipped over here and it'll be cheaper than g market.


You don't like the Korean hair dye products?
« Last Edit: July 17, 2017, 12:36:19 AM by Cyanea »
Catch my drift?

Offline Cyanea

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #45 on: July 17, 2017, 12:41:53 AM »
Here's some:

Pessimism - always complaining about shit

Most of that comes from the general powerlessness foreigners feel as outsiders.

Back home one is able to release any tension by directly altering, influencing or interracting with society as an equal part.

If there's one thing that defines the current trend in politics back home, its the belief that people are treated equally, that government reflects and is responsive to their interests, and that the ordinairy person feels that government is "in touch".

Yup you're not equal. You chose to accept that when you moved to another country as a temporary guest worker. It's a GOOD thing you are not equal and have little to no influence. That influence is for the citizens. You're not some citizen of the world who gets to fly to whatever country you please and attempt to influence and disrupt its society simply to suit your whims.

People need to accept inequality when that inequality is a rational and sensible structure.They also need to learn that just because they want to change things, it doesn't always mean they should.

Lol i don't even read your posts doc martin. 

but type away if it makes you feel better.
Catch my drift?

Offline weigookin74

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #46 on: July 17, 2017, 01:13:59 AM »
Can Koreans be that picky now?  Market's not as flooded as it once was. 

That, being over 35, being bald, being fat, not speaking North American English did get some folks non renewed during the peak of the recession however.

I'm just speculating, although I did help my school recruit at one point.

They basically ignored resumes from older guys over 30, so I'm assuming grey hair, baldness might tip the balance away from you, at least in Seoul.

It was quite surreal. There were applications from neatly-dressed men with good qualifications who were probably able to start the next day. There was even an application from a black guy with an Ivy league qualification. Not a second glance.

But my school just chased after flaky females with snotty phone voices who didn't even call back.

Quote
If you have an Amazon account, just for men can be shipped over here and it'll be cheaper than g market.


You don't like the Korean hair dye products?

Yikes?  Was this recently or quite a while back?  I know Korea hired a lot of people in the past who weren't their looks ideal, but then the Great Recession flooded the market and folks ended up on their butts.  These were folks with years of experience teaching in Korea.  Blond haired 22 year old American slim pretty females became the norm for a time.  I began to see mostly young teachers all around me.  I have over the past couple of years begun seeing older teachers again.  (Somewhat.)

I had heard Korean hair was different.  The dye has turned some western people's hair a weird color unless the person knows how to do western hair.  Also, if you have short hair, then you don't need much dye.  They hair shops can charge a lot even if they can do western hair.  Same price as for a woman with very long hair.  At least the just for men, 5 minutes at home, wash out, and done.  (Though I have dark hair, so maybe it won't be such a problem?)  Guess, I will dye when it gets bad enough.  Late 30's and have a few coming in (though still mostly dark hair). 

Offline weigookin74

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #47 on: July 17, 2017, 01:31:06 AM »
Though I spend a lot of time amongst Koreans and can know some of their thinking.  They do take care of their appearance try to avoid looking older - dying their hair, wearing a wig, etc.  As some westerners here get older, they seem to not care about their appearance.  That's what many Koreans have told me.  Going bald, going grey, gaining weight, etc.  (I have gradually gained some weight over the past 3 or 4 years and need to get on that; though I'm not obese or anything.)

Offline VanIslander

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #48 on: July 17, 2017, 02:59:51 AM »
As some westerners here get older, they seem to not care about their appearance.  That's what many Koreans have told me.  Going bald, going grey, gaining weight, etc.


We gotta look good for the chicas!

Offline weigookin74

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #49 on: July 17, 2017, 03:02:42 AM »
Not agreeing with the comments.  Just saying what they told me. 

Offline CJ

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #50 on: July 17, 2017, 02:56:47 PM »
For me at least, frequent colds and some mild respiratory issues due to pollution and dust.

Offline Dorozco

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #51 on: Yesterday at 03:31:54 PM »
Here's some:

Pessimism - always complaining about shit

Most of that comes from the general powerlessness foreigners feel as outsiders.

Back home one is able to release any tension by directly altering, influencing or interracting with society as an equal part.

If there's one thing that defines the current trend in politics back home, its the belief that people are treated equally, that government reflects and is responsive to their interests, and that the ordinairy person feels that government is "in touch".

Yup you're not equal. You chose to accept that when you moved to another country as a temporary guest worker. It's a GOOD thing you are not equal and have little to no influence. That influence is for the citizens. You're not some citizen of the world who gets to fly to whatever country you please and attempt to influence and disrupt its society simply to suit your whims.

People need to accept inequality when that inequality is a rational and sensible structure.They also need to learn that just because they want to change things, it doesn't always mean they should.

Thank you so much Dr. You understand what's going on. I understand that some people may treat me differently, sometimes for the worse, sometimes for the better (although even that can be with hidden intentions at worst), but you know what? I do what I do here, I try to follow the laws and norms of Korean society, and try my best to live a decent life. Anyone who tries to impose their cultural beliefs and walk all over the citizens of the host country are simply being whiny brats.

Offline emilysu

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #52 on: Yesterday at 03:41:36 PM »
For me at least, frequent colds and some mild respiratory issues due to pollution and dust.

This. I've developed acute sinusitis. Never had a problem back in Canada, but my sinuses are constantly on fire here. Even when the dust isn't that bad, gotta wear a mask (doctor's orders)!

Offline EditHero

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #53 on: Yesterday at 11:11:41 PM »

Quote
If you have an Amazon account, just for men can be shipped over here and it'll be cheaper than g market.


You don't like the Korean hair dye products?


I had heard Korean hair was different.  The dye has turned some western people's hair a weird color unless the person knows how to do western hair.  Also, if you have short hair, then you don't need much dye.  They hair shops can charge a lot even if they can do western hair.  Same price as for a woman with very long hair.  At least the just for men, 5 minutes at home, wash out, and done.  (Though I have dark hair, so maybe it won't be such a problem?)  Guess, I will dye when it gets bad enough.  Late 30's and have a few coming in (though still mostly dark hair).
[/quote]

Nope don't waste your money on that. Go to 남대문 and find 썬마트 a salon products store. Or find another one in your neighborhood they're all over. Go find the nice little 5,000 won boxes of Wella or L'oreal and pick the color you want from one of the nice little swatch books. Stand there with a blank look on your face with the dye in hand and someone will come over put a 5,000 won bottle in your other hand that should say 6% on it if they're smart, if not then say 6% to them. Take that home, mix the two up and stick it on your head, wait 30 mins, and you have a solid dye job. Way better staying power than anything from a box. And it'd last you ages, I have hair down my back and I get two dyes out of a tube. A guy would probably easily get ten, or more. Its a bit scary doing it the first time but once you do it youre golden for life, saving a ton of money, and you never have to deal with Incheon customs or putting the fate of your hair color in a korean salon's hands ever again.

Offline Andy73

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #54 on: Today at 08:30:23 AM »
Slowly going deaf.

Offline kobayashi

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #55 on: Today at 11:50:08 AM »
Yup you're not equal. You chose to accept that when you moved to another country as a temporary guest worker.

jog on with this BS mate. you think someone who's been here for 10 years and has permanent residency status is a 'guest worker'? you're delusional.

what about this woman? is she a 'temporary guest worker', what with her korean passport and all? http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/biz/2011/10/117_96613.html

there are no lengths you won't go to to defend koreans, are there?

Offline Mr.DeMartino

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #56 on: Today at 12:07:53 PM »
jog on with this BS mate. you think someone who's been here for 10 years and has permanent residency status is a 'guest worker'? you're delusional.

what about this woman? is she a 'temporary guest worker', what with her korean passport and all? http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/biz/2011/10/117_96613.html

there are no lengths you won't go to to defend koreans, are there?

So everyone on this site is a permanent resident? I'm speaking about the overwhelming majority of people here on this site who at some point are going back home. A small but decent enough number might become permanent residents. A very tiny number will become Korean nationals. Permanent residency I believe grants you the ability to vote in local elections and that's fine. Lobby on behalf of building a park or some other municipal actions. Fight for your rights as a permanent resident. But you are NOT a citizen. 

When you choose to move to another country as a non-citizen you give up certain rights and the a degree of influence. Morally it is wrong for people to move to other countries and to start trying to alter things beyond the rights and limits that they have been granted. The people of Korea do not exist to make you happy. They should not have to change their ways to make YOU happy. When you demand all these changes beyond any rights that are granted to you, you are saying that your own happiness supersedes their own.

The world is not your playground. Would you be fine with Koreans moving to your country and demanding things change to be more like Korea, even though they weren't citizens? I don't think so. I wouldn't.

One of the hardest things in life is to understand one's own limits and to say "I should not..." When you make choices like becoming a permanent resident or a temporary guest worker, you pay a price. That price is a decrease in your rights to influence society. If you want to be a full active member and have that influence, MOVE BACK HOME OR BECOME A CITIZEN.

Online gogators!

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #57 on: Today at 02:20:41 PM »
jog on with this BS mate. you think someone who's been here for 10 years and has permanent residency status is a 'guest worker'? you're delusional.

what about this woman? is she a 'temporary guest worker', what with her korean passport and all? http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/biz/2011/10/117_96613.html

there are no lengths you won't go to to defend koreans, are there?

So everyone on this site is a permanent resident? I'm speaking about the overwhelming majority of people here on this site who at some point are going back home. A small but decent enough number might become permanent residents. A very tiny number will become Korean nationals. Permanent residency I believe grants you the ability to vote in local elections and that's fine. Lobby on behalf of building a park or some other municipal actions. Fight for your rights as a permanent resident. But you are NOT a citizen. 

When you choose to move to another country as a non-citizen you give up certain rights and the a degree of influence. Morally it is wrong for people to move to other countries and to start trying to alter things beyond the rights and limits that they have been granted. The people of Korea do not exist to make you happy. They should not have to change their ways to make YOU happy. When you demand all these changes beyond any rights that are granted to you, you are saying that your own happiness supersedes their own.

The world is not your playground. Would you be fine with Koreans moving to your country and demanding things change to be more like Korea, even though they weren't citizens? I don't think so. I wouldn't.

One of the hardest things in life is to understand one's own limits and to say "I should not..." When you make choices like becoming a permanent resident or a temporary guest worker, you pay a price. That price is a decrease in your rights to influence society. If you want to be a full active member and have that influence, MOVE BACK HOME OR BECOME A CITIZEN.
So you dig being a Korean lackey? Just askin'.

Offline macteacher

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #58 on: Today at 02:49:44 PM »
Here's some:

Pessimism - always complaining about shit

Most of that comes from the general powerlessness foreigners feel as outsiders.

Back home one is able to release any tension by directly altering, influencing or interracting with society as an equal part.

If there's one thing that defines the current trend in politics back home, its the belief that people are treated equally, that government reflects and is responsive to their interests, and that the ordinairy person feels that government is "in touch".

Yup you're not equal. You chose to accept that when you moved to another country as a temporary guest worker. It's a GOOD thing you are not equal and have little to no influence. That influence is for the citizens. You're not some citizen of the world who gets to fly to whatever country you please and attempt to influence and disrupt its society simply to suit your whims.

People need to accept inequality when that inequality is a rational and sensible structure.They also need to learn that just because they want to change things, it doesn't always mean they should.


Koreans are some of the most migratory people (by percentage) in the world. they've settled in many countries. some more receptive than others (Usa vs say Russia). they've benefited from joining new cultures. you're wrong if you think those Koreans who relocated are not political. you can find stories of asians (not specified Korean but considering their desire for education) moving into school districts and taking control of the school board and making it more east Asian style. that's not a criticism but it's not just a western esl teacher thing to want a better life.

Offline eggieguffer

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Re: Typical ailments of the Korea esl teacher.
« Reply #59 on: Today at 02:55:34 PM »
Here's some:

Pessimism - always complaining about shit

Most of that comes from the general powerlessness foreigners feel as outsiders.

Back home one is able to release any tension by directly altering, influencing or interracting with society as an equal part.

If there's one thing that defines the current trend in politics back home, its the belief that people are treated equally, that government reflects and is responsive to their interests, and that the ordinairy person feels that government is "in touch".

Yup you're not equal. You chose to accept that when you moved to another country as a temporary guest worker. It's a GOOD thing you are not equal and have little to no influence. That influence is for the citizens. You're not some citizen of the world who gets to fly to whatever country you please and attempt to influence and disrupt its society simply to suit your whims.

People need to accept inequality when that inequality is a rational and sensible structure.They also need to learn that just because they want to change things, it doesn't always mean they should.


Koreans are some of the most migratory people (by percentage) in the world. they've settled in many countries. some more receptive than others (Usa vs say Russia). they've benefited from joining new cultures. you're wrong if you think those Koreans who relocated are not political. you can find stories of asians (not specified Korean but considering their desire for education) moving into school districts and taking control of the school board and making it more east Asian style. that's not a criticism but it's not just a western esl teacher thing to want a better life.

He was talking about guest workers not immigrants, though I think sometimes DM wants it both ways. When people say things need to change on here he trots out the guest worker response but when they complain that they don't know enough Korean to understand public school loud speaker announcements, he tells them they should have become culturally assimilated by now. So I guess we should be fluent in the language and behave like Koreans, without presuming to have any say in their society.

 

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