June 29, 2017, 04:20:55 AM


Author Topic: May Red Days?  (Read 4788 times)

Offline kriztee

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #40 on: April 17, 2017, 03:54:45 PM »
There seems to be a problem with native speakers in Korea assuming that their co-teachers are actually aware of all the laws, regulations and terms governing the NET contract.

Many co-teachers apply to be an English teacher because  they fear it will be difficult to juggle their own family life with the responsibilities of being a homeroom teacher. Some teachers decide that they want to improve their English and take the job for that reason. Others don't even apply to manage the NET contract, but are handed that responsibility simply because someone has to do it.

Honest question: Why do people assume all Korean English teachers cannot also be homeroom teachers? My CT has been a homeroom teacher 2 of 3 school years I've taught here. She's also my "handler," the head of the department, and a mother of two.

Is this to do with the size of the school? My first two CTs in a mid-sized middle school were just English teachers, but at my other tiny countryside school she had to do homeroom teaching. Now that I'm in two rural elementaries the CTs are all homeroom teachers again.

It's partially due to size, partially what the parents and principal want for the kids. I'm at a rural school who had an English teacher last year but the parents wanted the school to focus on science more so this year she teaches science and gym. Because it's a small school (about 40 kids total) there's only one subject teacher, everyone else is a homeroom teacher. If it's a big school then they'll have more subject teachers. At end of every year the teachers discuss what they want to teach, and the principal decides who will teach what grade and who will be a subject teacher. Some teachers want to be an English teacher, so if the subject teachers will teach English, they apply for that but make a bit less money. Some teachers get stuck being a subject teacher which could be English, or something else. It changes from school to school but that's the system all my schools follow this year (all 6  :cry: ) and my school last year used that system too.

Offline Baby Aubergine

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #41 on: April 17, 2017, 04:02:04 PM »
There seems to be a problem with native speakers in Korea assuming that their co-teachers are actually aware of all the laws, regulations and terms governing the NET contract.

Many co-teachers apply to be an English teacher because  they fear it will be difficult to juggle their own family life with the responsibilities of being a homeroom teacher. Some teachers decide that they want to improve their English and take the job for that reason. Others don't even apply to manage the NET contract, but are handed that responsibility simply because someone has to do it.

Honest question: Why do people assume all Korean English teachers cannot also be homeroom teachers? My CT has been a homeroom teacher 2 of 3 school years I've taught here. She's also my "handler," the head of the department, and a mother of two.

Is this to do with the size of the school? My first two CTs in a mid-sized middle school were just English teachers, but at my other tiny countryside school she had to do homeroom teaching. Now that I'm in two rural elementaries the CTs are all homeroom teachers again.

It's partially due to size, partially what the parents and principal want for the kids. I'm at a rural school who had an English teacher last year but the parents wanted the school to focus on science more so this year she teaches science and gym. Because it's a small school (about 40 kids total) there's only one subject teacher, everyone else is a homeroom teacher. If it's a big school then they'll have more subject teachers. At end of every year the teachers discuss what they want to teach, and the principal decides who will teach what grade and who will be a subject teacher. Some teachers want to be an English teacher, so if the subject teachers will teach English, they apply for that but make a bit less money. Some teachers get stuck being a subject teacher which could be English, or something else. It changes from school to school but that's the system all my schools follow this year (all 6  :cry: ) and my school last year used that system too.

SIX SCHOOLS??!!

Offline kriztee

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #42 on: April 17, 2017, 04:07:38 PM »
There seems to be a problem with native speakers in Korea assuming that their co-teachers are actually aware of all the laws, regulations and terms governing the NET contract.

Many co-teachers apply to be an English teacher because  they fear it will be difficult to juggle their own family life with the responsibilities of being a homeroom teacher. Some teachers decide that they want to improve their English and take the job for that reason. Others don't even apply to manage the NET contract, but are handed that responsibility simply because someone has to do it.

Honest question: Why do people assume all Korean English teachers cannot also be homeroom teachers? My CT has been a homeroom teacher 2 of 3 school years I've taught here. She's also my "handler," the head of the department, and a mother of two.

Is this to do with the size of the school? My first two CTs in a mid-sized middle school were just English teachers, but at my other tiny countryside school she had to do homeroom teaching. Now that I'm in two rural elementaries the CTs are all homeroom teachers again.

It's partially due to size, partially what the parents and principal want for the kids. I'm at a rural school who had an English teacher last year but the parents wanted the school to focus on science more so this year she teaches science and gym. Because it's a small school (about 40 kids total) there's only one subject teacher, everyone else is a homeroom teacher. If it's a big school then they'll have more subject teachers. At end of every year the teachers discuss what they want to teach, and the principal decides who will teach what grade and who will be a subject teacher. Some teachers want to be an English teacher, so if the subject teachers will teach English, they apply for that but make a bit less money. Some teachers get stuck being a subject teacher which could be English, or something else. It changes from school to school but that's the system all my schools follow this year (all 6  :cry: ) and my school last year used that system too.

SIX SCHOOLS??!!

Yup  :cry:

But my main ct is one of my least favorite people I've ever encountered so I'm damn glad I only have to see her once a week. And that's the day I have two schools so I'm there for 4 hours then get to run to the warmth and safety of my loving afternoon school :D

Offline weigookin74

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #43 on: April 17, 2017, 05:31:02 PM »
There seems to be a problem with native speakers in Korea assuming that their co-teachers are actually aware of all the laws, regulations and terms governing the NET contract.

Many co-teachers apply to be an English teacher because  they fear it will be difficult to juggle their own family life with the responsibilities of being a homeroom teacher. Some teachers decide that they want to improve their English and take the job for that reason. Others don't even apply to manage the NET contract, but are handed that responsibility simply because someone has to do it.

Honest question: Why do people assume all Korean English teachers cannot also be homeroom teachers? My CT has been a homeroom teacher 2 of 3 school years I've taught here. She's also my "handler," the head of the department, and a mother of two.

Is this to do with the size of the school? My first two CTs in a mid-sized middle school were just English teachers, but at my other tiny countryside school she had to do homeroom teaching. Now that I'm in two rural elementaries the CTs are all homeroom teachers again.

It's partially due to size, partially what the parents and principal want for the kids. I'm at a rural school who had an English teacher last year but the parents wanted the school to focus on science more so this year she teaches science and gym. Because it's a small school (about 40 kids total) there's only one subject teacher, everyone else is a homeroom teacher. If it's a big school then they'll have more subject teachers. At end of every year the teachers discuss what they want to teach, and the principal decides who will teach what grade and who will be a subject teacher. Some teachers want to be an English teacher, so if the subject teachers will teach English, they apply for that but make a bit less money. Some teachers get stuck being a subject teacher which could be English, or something else. It changes from school to school but that's the system all my schools follow this year (all 6  :cry: ) and my school last year used that system too.

It sounds like you only teach elementary?  When I was in the country, I rotated around to quite a few schools, though usually just one per day.  But, the education office always split us up.  Some days were middle and some were elementary.  I'm surprised they have you do only six elementary.  Did you request that? 

Offline kriztee

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #44 on: April 17, 2017, 05:37:38 PM »
There seems to be a problem with native speakers in Korea assuming that their co-teachers are actually aware of all the laws, regulations and terms governing the NET contract.

Many co-teachers apply to be an English teacher because  they fear it will be difficult to juggle their own family life with the responsibilities of being a homeroom teacher. Some teachers decide that they want to improve their English and take the job for that reason. Others don't even apply to manage the NET contract, but are handed that responsibility simply because someone has to do it.

Honest question: Why do people assume all Korean English teachers cannot also be homeroom teachers? My CT has been a homeroom teacher 2 of 3 school years I've taught here. She's also my "handler," the head of the department, and a mother of two.

Is this to do with the size of the school? My first two CTs in a mid-sized middle school were just English teachers, but at my other tiny countryside school she had to do homeroom teaching. Now that I'm in two rural elementaries the CTs are all homeroom teachers again.

It's partially due to size, partially what the parents and principal want for the kids. I'm at a rural school who had an English teacher last year but the parents wanted the school to focus on science more so this year she teaches science and gym. Because it's a small school (about 40 kids total) there's only one subject teacher, everyone else is a homeroom teacher. If it's a big school then they'll have more subject teachers. At end of every year the teachers discuss what they want to teach, and the principal decides who will teach what grade and who will be a subject teacher. Some teachers want to be an English teacher, so if the subject teachers will teach English, they apply for that but make a bit less money. Some teachers get stuck being a subject teacher which could be English, or something else. It changes from school to school but that's the system all my schools follow this year (all 6  :cry: ) and my school last year used that system too.

It sounds like you only teach elementary?  When I was in the country, I rotated around to quite a few schools, though usually just one per day.  But, the education office always split us up.  Some days were middle and some were elementary.  I'm surprised they have you do only six elementary.  Did you request that?
Yeah I'm all elementary but I didn't request it XD I actually wanted to teach middle or high. When I go back home I want to either teach high school or university (still deciding if I want to do my masters or teachers college...) so I don't know why I keep getting stuck with elementary o.o I almost died last year finding out that not only was I elementary (only one last year) but 6 classes a week were for 1st or 2nd grade!!!!!! I taught each class 3 times a week and little, little kids is not my ideal teaching demographic. They ended up being cool but I much prefer sassy stubborn 6th graders to kids who don't know how to sit down and shut up o.o

Offline yirj17

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #45 on: April 17, 2017, 05:40:17 PM »
There seems to be a problem with native speakers in Korea assuming that their co-teachers are actually aware of all the laws, regulations and terms governing the NET contract.

Many co-teachers apply to be an English teacher because  they fear it will be difficult to juggle their own family life with the responsibilities of being a homeroom teacher. Some teachers decide that they want to improve their English and take the job for that reason. Others don't even apply to manage the NET contract, but are handed that responsibility simply because someone has to do it.

Honest question: Why do people assume all Korean English teachers cannot also be homeroom teachers? My CT has been a homeroom teacher 2 of 3 school years I've taught here. She's also my "handler," the head of the department, and a mother of two.

Is this to do with the size of the school? My first two CTs in a mid-sized middle school were just English teachers, but at my other tiny countryside school she had to do homeroom teaching. Now that I'm in two rural elementaries the CTs are all homeroom teachers again.

It's partially due to size, partially what the parents and principal want for the kids. I'm at a rural school who had an English teacher last year but the parents wanted the school to focus on science more so this year she teaches science and gym. Because it's a small school (about 40 kids total) there's only one subject teacher, everyone else is a homeroom teacher. If it's a big school then they'll have more subject teachers. At end of every year the teachers discuss what they want to teach, and the principal decides who will teach what grade and who will be a subject teacher. Some teachers want to be an English teacher, so if the subject teachers will teach English, they apply for that but make a bit less money. Some teachers get stuck being a subject teacher which could be English, or something else. It changes from school to school but that's the system all my schools follow this year (all 6  :cry: ) and my school last year used that system too.

SIX SCHOOLS??!!

Yup  :cry:

But my main ct is one of my least favorite people I've ever encountered so I'm damn glad I only have to see her once a week. And that's the day I have two schools so I'm there for 4 hours then get to run to the warmth and safety of my loving afternoon school :D


Lol that was my reaction when I first found out how many schools Kriztee has.  :laugh:

Offline kriztee

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #46 on: April 17, 2017, 05:44:49 PM »
There seems to be a problem with native speakers in Korea assuming that their co-teachers are actually aware of all the laws, regulations and terms governing the NET contract.

Many co-teachers apply to be an English teacher because  they fear it will be difficult to juggle their own family life with the responsibilities of being a homeroom teacher. Some teachers decide that they want to improve their English and take the job for that reason. Others don't even apply to manage the NET contract, but are handed that responsibility simply because someone has to do it.

Honest question: Why do people assume all Korean English teachers cannot also be homeroom teachers? My CT has been a homeroom teacher 2 of 3 school years I've taught here. She's also my "handler," the head of the department, and a mother of two.

Is this to do with the size of the school? My first two CTs in a mid-sized middle school were just English teachers, but at my other tiny countryside school she had to do homeroom teaching. Now that I'm in two rural elementaries the CTs are all homeroom teachers again.

It's partially due to size, partially what the parents and principal want for the kids. I'm at a rural school who had an English teacher last year but the parents wanted the school to focus on science more so this year she teaches science and gym. Because it's a small school (about 40 kids total) there's only one subject teacher, everyone else is a homeroom teacher. If it's a big school then they'll have more subject teachers. At end of every year the teachers discuss what they want to teach, and the principal decides who will teach what grade and who will be a subject teacher. Some teachers want to be an English teacher, so if the subject teachers will teach English, they apply for that but make a bit less money. Some teachers get stuck being a subject teacher which could be English, or something else. It changes from school to school but that's the system all my schools follow this year (all 6  :cry: ) and my school last year used that system too.

SIX SCHOOLS??!!

Yup  :cry:

But my main ct is one of my least favorite people I've ever encountered so I'm damn glad I only have to see her once a week. And that's the day I have two schools so I'm there for 4 hours then get to run to the warmth and safety of my loving afternoon school :D


Lol that was my reaction when I first found out how many schools Kriztee has.  :laugh:
Six schools, 15 coteachers. Living the dream. Y'all haters need to back off with the jealousy  :cry:

Offline eastcoast

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #47 on: April 17, 2017, 06:41:14 PM »
At our uni I postponed the extra days in the school's online system and will be taking a week trip abroad

Offline StillInKorea

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #48 on: April 17, 2017, 10:57:45 PM »
Six schools, 15 coteachers. Living the dream. Y'all haters need to back off with the jealousy  :cry:

I don't know how (or if) they expect you to make any kind of difference with that many schools and co-teachers. Maybe the point is just to have a western face at as many schools as possible, but it really does seem like a waste of money, even if you're the greatest teacher in the world.

Offline Grimne_Lothos

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #49 on: April 21, 2017, 12:20:22 PM »
I'm an E2 but listed as an independent contractor.

this situation is impossible. an E2 needs a visa sponsor, but an independent contractor is someone who works without a sponsor. you can't sponsor your own E2.

this is not correct.   
IC status has nothing to do with visa sponsorship and everything to do with your working conditions.
There are plenty of legit ICs on E2s.  I know one who gets extra scrutiny every time he brings in his contract to renew his ARC because his contract is so different from the norm but immigration signs off on it every time.

Offline kriztee

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #50 on: April 21, 2017, 12:33:36 PM »
Six schools, 15 coteachers. Living the dream. Y'all haters need to back off with the jealousy  :cry:

I don't know how (or if) they expect you to make any kind of difference with that many schools and co-teachers. Maybe the point is just to have a western face at as many schools as possible, but it really does seem like a waste of money, even if you're the greatest teacher in the world.

Supposedly what happened is that some of the foreign teachers complained that some teachers got schools close to their house and went there every day while others had a bunch of schools so now every teacher in my city has multiple schools like this. There's one school where I go for 2 hours in the afternoon and there's a DIFFERENT NET THERE IN THE MORNING WHO GOES TO A DIFFERENT SCHOOL WHEN I GET THERE. It's the worst. That school has 4 native teachers and we all get between 2-4 hours there a week. They 100% don't know how to organize here and I don't know if I believe the whole "the NETs before you asked for this 'equality'" thing...

Offline yirj17

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #51 on: April 21, 2017, 12:38:31 PM »
Six schools, 15 coteachers. Living the dream. Y'all haters need to back off with the jealousy  :cry:

I don't know how (or if) they expect you to make any kind of difference with that many schools and co-teachers. Maybe the point is just to have a western face at as many schools as possible, but it really does seem like a waste of money, even if you're the greatest teacher in the world.

Supposedly what happened is that some of the foreign teachers complained that some teachers got schools close to their house and went there every day while others had a bunch of schools so now every teacher in my city has multiple schools like this. There's one school where I go for 2 hours in the afternoon and there's a DIFFERENT NET THERE IN THE MORNING WHO GOES TO A DIFFERENT SCHOOL WHEN I GET THERE. It's the worst. That school has 4 native teachers and we all get between 2-4 hours there a week. They 100% don't know how to organize here and I don't know if I believe the whole "the NETs before you asked for this 'equality'" thing...


I'm the only NET at my 4 schools, and while I understand that they all want their respective students to have exposure to a foreigner, I kinda doubt I'm having much effect on their actual English skills as I only see each class once a week. 

On the bright side, they're always happy to see me and eager to spit out any English they've got. 

Offline CO2

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #52 on: April 21, 2017, 12:39:53 PM »
I'm staying in country. And I have a weird plan.

I will go to the extremes of the subway system.

For 5 days. A day in Yeoju (new line opened up). A day in Yongin. A day in YongMun and JiPyeong (gotta check out the makgeolli brewery). A day in Paju, Asan.

I will travel around Gyeonggi going into its depths.

Every night, sleep at a sauna.

This will be endurance, a trial of sorts. And cheap as ****.

Wish me luck.
For all things that could have been
Well, at least we took the ride
There's no relief in bitterness
Might as well let it die

Offline kriztee

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #53 on: April 21, 2017, 12:49:36 PM »
Six schools, 15 coteachers. Living the dream. Y'all haters need to back off with the jealousy  :cry:

I don't know how (or if) they expect you to make any kind of difference with that many schools and co-teachers. Maybe the point is just to have a western face at as many schools as possible, but it really does seem like a waste of money, even if you're the greatest teacher in the world.

Supposedly what happened is that some of the foreign teachers complained that some teachers got schools close to their house and went there every day while others had a bunch of schools so now every teacher in my city has multiple schools like this. There's one school where I go for 2 hours in the afternoon and there's a DIFFERENT NET THERE IN THE MORNING WHO GOES TO A DIFFERENT SCHOOL WHEN I GET THERE. It's the worst. That school has 4 native teachers and we all get between 2-4 hours there a week. They 100% don't know how to organize here and I don't know if I believe the whole "the NETs before you asked for this 'equality'" thing...


I'm the only NET at my 4 schools, and while I understand that they all want their respective students to have exposure to a foreigner, I kinda doubt I'm having much effect on their actual English skills as I only see each class once a week. 

On the bright side, they're always happy to see me and eager to spit out any English they've got.
Yeah I feel you. At one of my schools the kids are super brave and will actually do free talking, but in the other schools, the kids are super quiet and can barely say hello. If they had me there more often it's easier for them to be more comfortable talking because they'd know me better :/

Offline yirj17

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #54 on: April 21, 2017, 12:52:13 PM »
Six schools, 15 coteachers. Living the dream. Y'all haters need to back off with the jealousy  :cry:

I don't know how (or if) they expect you to make any kind of difference with that many schools and co-teachers. Maybe the point is just to have a western face at as many schools as possible, but it really does seem like a waste of money, even if you're the greatest teacher in the world.

Supposedly what happened is that some of the foreign teachers complained that some teachers got schools close to their house and went there every day while others had a bunch of schools so now every teacher in my city has multiple schools like this. There's one school where I go for 2 hours in the afternoon and there's a DIFFERENT NET THERE IN THE MORNING WHO GOES TO A DIFFERENT SCHOOL WHEN I GET THERE. It's the worst. That school has 4 native teachers and we all get between 2-4 hours there a week. They 100% don't know how to organize here and I don't know if I believe the whole "the NETs before you asked for this 'equality'" thing...


I'm the only NET at my 4 schools, and while I understand that they all want their respective students to have exposure to a foreigner, I kinda doubt I'm having much effect on their actual English skills as I only see each class once a week. 

On the bright side, they're always happy to see me and eager to spit out any English they've got.
Yeah I feel you. At one of my schools the kids are super brave and will actually do free talking, but in the other schools, the kids are super quiet and can barely say hello. If they had me there more often it's easier for them to be more comfortable talking because they'd know me better :/


Right.  My middle school students opened up fairly quickly but some of my elementary schoolers took a while longer.  Honestly I think they're this comfortable now because this is my second year. 

Offline kriztee

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #55 on: April 21, 2017, 01:22:04 PM »
Six schools, 15 coteachers. Living the dream. Y'all haters need to back off with the jealousy  :cry:

I don't know how (or if) they expect you to make any kind of difference with that many schools and co-teachers. Maybe the point is just to have a western face at as many schools as possible, but it really does seem like a waste of money, even if you're the greatest teacher in the world.

Supposedly what happened is that some of the foreign teachers complained that some teachers got schools close to their house and went there every day while others had a bunch of schools so now every teacher in my city has multiple schools like this. There's one school where I go for 2 hours in the afternoon and there's a DIFFERENT NET THERE IN THE MORNING WHO GOES TO A DIFFERENT SCHOOL WHEN I GET THERE. It's the worst. That school has 4 native teachers and we all get between 2-4 hours there a week. They 100% don't know how to organize here and I don't know if I believe the whole "the NETs before you asked for this 'equality'" thing...


I'm the only NET at my 4 schools, and while I understand that they all want their respective students to have exposure to a foreigner, I kinda doubt I'm having much effect on their actual English skills as I only see each class once a week. 

On the bright side, they're always happy to see me and eager to spit out any English they've got.
Yeah I feel you. At one of my schools the kids are super brave and will actually do free talking, but in the other schools, the kids are super quiet and can barely say hello. If they had me there more often it's easier for them to be more comfortable talking because they'd know me better :/


Right.  My middle school students opened up fairly quickly but some of my elementary schoolers took a while longer.  Honestly I think they're this comfortable now because this is my second year.
It's such a change from last year when I taught each class at least 3 times a week. They were smallish classes too so I got to know the  kids really well and they were fearless when talking to me. Especially my first graders. But now I'm almost 2 months in so I've seen each class like maybe 8 times so far. Its fo sho not enough.

Offline kobayashi

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #56 on: April 21, 2017, 03:37:49 PM »
I'm an E2 but listed as an independent contractor.

this situation is impossible. an E2 needs a visa sponsor, but an independent contractor is someone who works without a sponsor. you can't sponsor your own E2.

this is not correct.   
IC status has nothing to do with visa sponsorship and everything to do with your working conditions.
There are plenty of legit ICs on E2s.  I know one who gets extra scrutiny every time he brings in his contract to renew his ARC because his contract is so different from the norm but immigration signs off on it every time.

this is simply not correct. the whole point of being an independent contractor is that you can work multiple jobs, set your own conditions, and leave a job and find a new one at any point without restriction. people on E-2 visas simply cannot do this.

that aside, there was a court ruling in 2015 that said that being an independent contractor on an E-2 is illegal.

you cannot be an independent contractor on an E-2 visa. it is simply illegal, as ruled by a korean court of law.

Offline donuts81

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Re: May Red Days?
« Reply #57 on: April 21, 2017, 07:57:32 PM »
May 1st should be a holiday for public school. Hagwon? If they have classes, you're showing up. As for the gap days, if they say work, you're working. For public schools most of you should be looking at no school from Wed.- next Tue, possibly the 1st and 2nd too if you're lucky.

One thing to remember before storming in waving the contract and screaming "rules are rules"- a lot of times the school or hagwon can turn the rules right around and make life a pain. Don't let them cheat you out of a holiday, but understand the consequences of going nuclear on them. Just make sure you aren't sitting in an empty school on Thur. the 4th and Mon. the 8th because you tried to make a point about the rules and what days are legally holidays.

This is a good point. There are a few other days through out the year which aren't actual national vacation days but are given off by some hagwons. 

Even if they don't want to give you May 1st it's worth while bringing it up and asking their reasoning (in a non-dickish way).
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