December 11, 2017, 11:48:27 AM

Author Topic: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools  (Read 1089 times)

Online cuthza

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Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« on: March 20, 2017, 10:44:47 AM »
My co-teacher mentioned that my previous teacher used a points system to reward participation and then at the end of the semester the most points got candy or something.

Now, my question is multiple school related. I teach at three different schools and apart from the lesson planning and scheduling for different grades at each school it's difficult to keep track of so many students. I don't know how I'm even supposed to remember their names, let alone institute three reward systems for like 6 different classes in each grade.

Is this plausible? To me it seems not but I may be missing something.

Online Elegy

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2017, 10:49:41 AM »
If the kids have English notebooks, have 'em glue in a grid or sheet on the inside of the front page where you put stamps for work well done or something like that. Last Friday of each month, have a thing where the kids with the most stamps get to choose a prize from a bag of cheap goodies or something like that.

Offline tommyb.goode

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2017, 10:55:43 AM »
I've tried the above stamp system, it's great. If they get ten, they get a prize.

If you're teaching small classes I recommend using Class Dojo, it's really easy: I tried it this term and everyone's hands are up because they want to get points.

If you have large classes, you can give some sweets to winning teams of games and activities you play in class. Always works well for me.

Online cuthza

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2017, 12:40:28 PM »
If the kids have English notebooks, have 'em glue in a grid or sheet on the inside of the front page where you put stamps for work well done or something like that. Last Friday of each month, have a thing where the kids with the most stamps get to choose a prize from a bag of cheap goodies or something like that.

That sounds like a good plan! Thanks for the suggestion.

Offline emmas28

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2017, 01:04:18 PM »
I've tried the above stamp system, it's great. If they get ten, they get a prize.

If you're teaching small classes I recommend using Class Dojo, it's really easy: I tried it this term and everyone's hands are up because they want to get points.

If you have large classes, you can give some sweets to winning teams of games and activities you play in class. Always works well for me.

I abolsutely love Class Dojo! This is my second my years using it and the kids love it. You can use it in a couple of ways. Like Tommy said if the classes are small you can input their names. You can also input just their numbers (less personal) or name and numbers so you can have a chance at learning their names. It's all online so no messy stamps and stickers and papers, just log in and click to add points.

Depending on the class size, you can let the kids choose their own monsters so they feel it's a bit more special. It's also good for putting students into groups and recording attendance.

Can you tell I'm a fan?  ;D

Offline chupacaubrey

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2017, 02:42:39 PM »
I don't have multiple schools but what I'm doing is a lotto drawing each month. Basically a stamp system but without the papers to hand out. I cut up cheap origami paper or doodle on scrap paper to make tickets and hand them out for participation/winning games/etc.

I have a modest budget at my school to buy snacks and lip balms and pens and such. I'm actually really excited about it! I think it's also a bit better at incentivizing because I can give lots of tickets out since it really just increases the odds for students to win prizes while the number I draw each month remains the same. Most of my kids are really into it.

Hope this helps!

Online Mr C

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2017, 07:42:12 AM »
I've tried the above stamp system, it's great. If they get ten, they get a prize.
Although, that's not the same as the system alluded to above.  In your scheme, which I prefer, students receive a reward upon reaching a certain level of accomplishment.  In the system where students with the most stamps are rewarded, there is yet another level of competition. 

The kid who slugs along and improves incrementally will seldom get rewards, whereas the same group of high achievers win yet again.  Nothing wrong of course with rewarding high achievers, but ...

Offline chrisinkorea2011

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2017, 08:02:51 AM »
I've tried the above stamp system, it's great. If they get ten, they get a prize.

If you're teaching small classes I recommend using Class Dojo, it's really easy: I tried it this term and everyone's hands are up because they want to get points.

If you have large classes, you can give some sweets to winning teams of games and activities you play in class. Always works well for me.

I changed to a stamp system this year because I realized from class research for my graduate courses that they are well versed in trying to sabotage each other in order to win for group games or single achievement. Instead, I give the entire class one sheet that is kept at the front of the room and is based not only on achievement for the day but also on participation, teamwork, and completion of material. It ranges from 1 - 3 stamps a day and every 10 earns a piece of chocolate or small reward, which i feel is much more deserved.

Offline AlivePoet

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2017, 08:12:17 AM »
I don't have multiple schools but what I'm doing is a lotto drawing each month. Basically a stamp system but without the papers to hand out. I cut up cheap origami paper or doodle on scrap paper to make tickets and hand them out for participation/winning games/etc.

I have a modest budget at my school to buy snacks and lip balms and pens and such. I'm actually really excited about it! I think it's also a bit better at incentivizing because I can give lots of tickets out since it really just increases the odds for students to win prizes while the number I draw each month remains the same. Most of my kids are really into it.

Hope this helps!


I also have a lotto drawing ticket system. Students who participate (raising hands to answer questions, writing on the board, practicing with partner, etc.) get their lotto tickets at the end of each class, and at the end of the month, I have a lotto draw for each class (usually 7 prizes a class, mostly candy/ramen/small notebooks etc). I spend about 40 bucks a month on the prizes out of my own pocket. If your co-teachers are awesome they might offer to help with the expenses.

I've used this system for 2 years and it has been very effective in my classes. I understand why some teachers wouldn't want to spend this much money, but for myself, it's worth it.

Online cuthza

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2017, 08:21:36 AM »
I don't have multiple schools but what I'm doing is a lotto drawing each month. Basically a stamp system but without the papers to hand out. I cut up cheap origami paper or doodle on scrap paper to make tickets and hand them out for participation/winning games/etc.

I have a modest budget at my school to buy snacks and lip balms and pens and such. I'm actually really excited about it! I think it's also a bit better at incentivizing because I can give lots of tickets out since it really just increases the odds for students to win prizes while the number I draw each month remains the same. Most of my kids are really into it.

Hope this helps!


I also have a lotto drawing ticket system. Students who participate (raising hands to answer questions, writing on the board, practicing with partner, etc.) get their lotto tickets at the end of each class, and at the end of the month, I have a lotto draw for each class (usually 7 prizes a class, mostly candy/ramen/small notebooks etc). I spend about 40 bucks a month on the prizes out of my own pocket. If your co-teachers are awesome they might offer to help with the expenses.

I've used this system for 2 years and it has been very effective in my classes. I understand why some teachers wouldn't want to spend this much money, but for myself, it's worth it.

How many classes do you have though? I have 17 classes with different students in each class at different schools. I could see that getting very pricey!

Offline AlivePoet

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2017, 09:08:36 AM »
How many classes do you have though? I have 17 classes with different students in each class at different schools. I could see that getting very pricey!

Right...it would. I teach a total of 13 different classes  (9 of those twice a week). I look for sales and mass stock up on maiju, chocolate, etc. when they go on sale at Home Plus. Helps keep costs down but there are months where I spend more than 40,000 probably. Maybe see if your co-teachers would be willing to help out with the costs?

Offline tommyb.goode

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2017, 09:18:09 AM »
I've tried the above stamp system, it's great. If they get ten, they get a prize.
Although, that's not the same as the system alluded to above.  In your scheme, which I prefer, students receive a reward upon reaching a certain level of accomplishment.  In the system where students with the most stamps are rewarded, there is yet another level of competition. 

The kid who slugs along and improves incrementally will seldom get rewards, whereas the same group of high achievers win yet again.  Nothing wrong of course with rewarding high achievers, but ...

I try to reward kids based on how they've done as an individual and try not to compare them with other students: some kids are quieter and don't like speaking or their level is a lot lower. I don't have any set criteria that allows me to reward kids of different levels and personalities

Offline Chitown312

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #12 on: March 21, 2017, 10:42:22 AM »
I also do a lotto/raffle.  I have been doing it for 3 years now and students really like it.  I agree though, it does get a little expensive.  I usually have two baskets of prizes. One basket is more expensive things and the other is simple candy.  I usually have the raffle day every 2 weeks.  Winner can choose one prize from each basket.  I usually fill them with candy, stickers, pencils, erasers, and other snacks.  I attached my raffle tickets and raffle decal to print out and stick on your raffle jar/container.  Hope this helps :)

Online Mr C

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #13 on: March 21, 2017, 11:44:21 AM »
I've tried the above stamp system, it's great. If they get ten, they get a prize.
Although, that's not the same as the system alluded to above.  In your scheme, which I prefer, students receive a reward upon reaching a certain level of accomplishment.  In the system where students with the most stamps are rewarded, there is yet another level of competition. 

The kid who slugs along and improves incrementally will seldom get rewards, whereas the same group of high achievers win yet again.  Nothing wrong of course with rewarding high achievers, but ...

I try to reward kids based on how they've done as an individual and try not to compare them with other students: some kids are quieter and don't like speaking or their level is a lot lower. I don't have any set criteria that allows me to reward kids of different levels and personalities
Right, I'm with you.  I must have been unclear.  I meant the poster previous to you who wrote about only giving prizes to the students who get the most stamps.

Online Elegy

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2017, 11:50:04 AM »
To clarify, the stamp-in-the-book system I use has a set progression to where each 5 stamps, 10 stamps, 15 stamps, and so on, there's a different prize and I also do the lotto at the end of the month. That way, quiet students still receive rewards (candy and so on) throughout the year, but the most active and energetic ones will receive an additional boon in the form of the monthly lotto.

Any system where students have some incentive works wonders!

Offline gaelynwrites

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Re: Reward systems? Specifically at multiple schools
« Reply #15 on: March 21, 2017, 11:59:48 AM »
This wont really work at multiple schools but I'll share my system.

We have a coin system. Every student has a piggy bank, and each class has a class bank.

Class coins are earned through games (the whole class gets the participation coin), everyone doing their homework, everyone in a class earning over a certain grade on a test. When the class have 5 coins (I have small classes) they all get a coin for their personal bank.

Individual coins are earn by scoring over a certain grade on a test, answering a particularly hard question, or knowing an answer right away (this is harder to monitor because some students are just better at English.)

They can also lose coins by not turning in a signed test, or misbehaving in class.

At the end of the semester we have a coin market where after their midterm/final they get to trade their coins for things like pencils, toys, games, puzzles, erasers, etc.

My students beg for coins so they don't want to lose them and the threat of them being lost encourages them to remind each other about homework and to study for tests.