June 29, 2017, 04:22:22 AM


Author Topic: Samsung galaxy note 7  (Read 2808 times)

Offline Lurch

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Re: Samsung galaxy note 7
« Reply #20 on: October 12, 2016, 11:08:51 AM »
I wonder if the Korean media is reporting the same things I see in the western media. Some choice headlines of the past few days include (paraphrased): "Samsung Says to Turn Off Your Note 7 Now" and "Samsung to Permanently End Production of the Galaxy Note 7 Phone". There was a show on Korean TV over the weekend that was talking about exploding batteries, but it mentioned iPhones and electronic cigarettes as culprits as well as the Note 7. *eyerollingemoticon* I got an ad for some phone place selling the Note 7 stuck to my mailbox yesterday. It wouldn't be the first time Samsung has screwed their local customers.

Offline Cheezus

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Re: Samsung galaxy note 7
« Reply #21 on: October 12, 2016, 02:33:30 PM »
Hey guys.
So was wondering if anyony else took a contract out with Olleh and got a replacement but no freebies? Seriouslly reading about people getting gear fits and other stuff...

I got a gear fit and wireless charger with LG U+. Also another wireless charger and LED Cover through samsung pay...

BUT

My co-worker on the same deal as me said that samsung is saying with have to give all the free stuff back unless we downgrade to a Note 5 or S7 HAHHAHAHA.

Offline Teemowork

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Re: Samsung galaxy note 7
« Reply #22 on: October 14, 2016, 11:47:40 AM »
Sucks to be Samsung now.  Their flagship phablet starts exploding since release, they recalled it and issued replacements, but the replacements start exploding too.  It didn't matter if the phone wasn't charging, sitting idle on a table, or even turned off, it could still explode.  The process happens so fast, some people can't even take the phone out of their pocket in time, suffer severe burns and toxic battery chemicals leaking into their flesh.  Others, just being near the phone and inhaling the toxic fumes of a burning lithium battery causes them to faint.

And now to top it off...looks like a few more people outside Korea will be be shocked to learn of what its like to work at "the #1 company in Korea."  If this is the life of working at the "best" company, I wonder what it's like to work at the "worst", or even an average company.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/10/13/leaked_samsung_doc_highlights_toxic_culture/

Keep in mind too, this is the standard Samsung office culture PRE-note7 incident.  So now, when s*** just hit the ceiling, what do you think the execs are doing to their workers now?

Wonder if some people will choose to stop buying Samsung, kinda like how some refuse to shop at Walmart because they don't want to support a company that exploits labor in such a way.

Offline SkidMarx

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Re: Samsung galaxy note 7
« Reply #23 on: October 14, 2016, 02:34:45 PM »
How many actually went on fire out of the millions sold? Obviously one is too many but the media make it sound like every third phone was going up or something.

Does anyone know if they are even available any more? I was going to trade up tonight but I guess I can't if they are officially off the market.

Offline SmallBaguette

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Re: Samsung galaxy note 7
« Reply #24 on: October 14, 2016, 04:00:24 PM »
How many actually went on fire out of the millions sold? Obviously one is too many but the media make it sound like every third phone was going up or something.

Does anyone know if they are even available any more? I was going to trade up tonight but I guess I can't if they are officially off the market.

From the last figures I read, about a week ago, it was still significantly under the 100 mark. It's obviously happening at a higher rate, and in a shorter time, than the usual amount of defective units that would be expected from any large scale product release.

Offline Teemowork

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Re: Samsung galaxy note 7
« Reply #25 on: October 14, 2016, 04:30:11 PM »
How many actually went on fire out of the millions sold? Obviously one is too many but the media make it sound like every third phone was going up or something.

Does anyone know if they are even available any more? I was going to trade up tonight but I guess I can't if they are officially off the market.

From the last figures I read, about a week ago, it was still significantly under the 100 mark. It's obviously happening at a higher rate, and in a shorter time, than the usual amount of defective units that would be expected from any large scale product release.

Exactly ^

Everyone knows that there are always some expected defects for any product.  But usually other product defects we hear about were relatively harmless and simply caused the device to stop functioning.

However, in the Note 7 situation, it's an actual fire and chemical hazard in almost every case.  Even when there weren't fires, people still reported that their product was unusually hot or didn't charge properly, which is also considered a defect.

Having like 30+ incidents within a week or so isn't normal.  And the only reason the incidents have died down is because of the recall announcement.  People have been powering down their phones and returning them to their carriers, which is why you aren't hearing the issues come up at the same rate as the initial release period.

If the defect just simply caused the phone to crash or not work, it wouldn't be as big of deal.  But in this case, it's too much of a consumer safety hazard.  Because again, the phone can randomly pop and burst into flames while its charging, when it's just sitting on the desk idle, and even when it's TURNED OFF.  The circuitry in the phone isn't in a complete off state even when the phone is "off".  Slight current is always running to keep certain things, such as the internal clock, working.

Unlike the Sony case years ago, a Note 7 doesn't have a removable back cover.  So, Samsung can't just send out "safe" batteries to everyone to pop in and replace.  Although, this is assuming that the battery is indeed the real issue though.

Offline pkjh

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Re: Samsung galaxy note 7
« Reply #26 on: October 14, 2016, 06:30:56 PM »
How many actually went on fire out of the millions sold? Obviously one is too many but the media make it sound like every third phone was going up or something.

Does anyone know if they are even available any more? I was going to trade up tonight but I guess I can't if they are officially off the market.

From the last figures I read, about a week ago, it was still significantly under the 100 mark. It's obviously happening at a higher rate, and in a shorter time, than the usual amount of defective units that would be expected from any large scale product release.

Exactly ^

Everyone knows that there are always some expected defects for any product.  But usually other product defects we hear about were relatively harmless and simply caused the device to stop functioning.

However, in the Note 7 situation, it's an actual fire and chemical hazard in almost every case.  Even when there weren't fires, people still reported that their product was unusually hot or didn't charge properly, which is also considered a defect.

Having like 30+ incidents within a week or so isn't normal.  And the only reason the incidents have died down is because of the recall announcement.  People have been powering down their phones and returning them to their carriers, which is why you aren't hearing the issues come up at the same rate as the initial release period.

If the defect just simply caused the phone to crash or not work, it wouldn't be as big of deal.  But in this case, it's too much of a consumer safety hazard.  Because again, the phone can randomly pop and burst into flames while its charging, when it's just sitting on the desk idle, and even when it's TURNED OFF.  The circuitry in the phone isn't in a complete off state even when the phone is "off".  Slight current is always running to keep certain things, such as the internal clock, working.

Unlike the Sony case years ago, a Note 7 doesn't have a removable back cover.  So, Samsung can't just send out "safe" batteries to everyone to pop in and replace.  Although, this is assuming that the battery is indeed the real issue though.

My guess is that they don't really know what' wrong. These circuits are pretty complicated. But my bet it's just drawing too much power from the battery. Just look at how much the cell phone has evolved into essentially a computer more powerful than a computer built 10 years ago. And that requires electricity. And you still have the same old Li-ion battery. There are better kinds of experimental batteries out there, but at the moment nobody in the industry has been able to manufacture those batteries at similar price (aka affordable) as that old Li-Ion battery.

Offline Teemowork

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Re: Samsung galaxy note 7
« Reply #27 on: October 14, 2016, 07:42:05 PM »
My guess is that they don't really know what' wrong. These circuits are pretty complicated. But my bet it's just drawing too much power from the battery. Just look at how much the cell phone has evolved into essentially a computer more powerful than a computer built 10 years ago. And that requires electricity. And you still have the same old Li-ion battery. There are better kinds of experimental batteries out there, but at the moment nobody in the industry has been able to manufacture those batteries at similar price (aka affordable) as that old Li-Ion battery.

I disagree actually.  Even though circuitry has gotten more complicated over the years, its not in the way that you think in complexity.  The same physics that drives electrical current, the same physics that stores information in NAND gates, those are all the same as it has always been.  Circuits have just gotten smaller in size and denser, not actually more complicated.  It's kinda like instead of having 1 cubic meter sized legos to make a 10 meter tall character, you are just using 1 centimeter cubed sized legos, to make the same 10 meter tall character.  Overall, you use relatively the same amount of "Lego materials", and have gotten more detail, but the building blocks and design philosophy are actually the same.

Computers, big or small, have always been built on the same fundamentals.  And the truth of the matter is that as technology improves to more powerful devices, the trend is that newer devices are drawing LESS power.  Samsung has even proved this when their AMOLED displays from the Galaxy s5 and the galaxy s5 LTE-A.  They were able to make 2 different versions of the phone, one with a 1080p screen, and another with a 2K display, which uses the EXACT SAME battery drain.  Intel has shown this with their previous tick-tock manufacturing styles.  Apple has done this with their own iphone CPU's as well.  And so have hundreds of other manufacturers since the invention of electronics.

As processors improve, material use to create them actually stay the same.  The CPU die is always more or less the same size, its just the nanometer process its built on changes to a "smaller" scale.  Basically, more transistor density because the size of each transistor is also smaller to fill the area, but they also individually draw less power.  So the end result is, you get a more powerful processor, in the same chip size, with about the same power drain, or LESS.

Lithium Ion batteries have always been used for the last several decades because it has a good track record for doing its job.  In manufacturing, you want something made of an easily producible material, is consistent in getting the job done, and maintains profitable costs.

The current rumor is actually that the Samsung engineers CHANGED the design of their battery for the note 7, away from all of the current industry standards, and away from every other Samsung phone released, and that the design was flawed with a weaker physical structure.  This would consistently support why both batteries from Samsung SDI and the Chinese factory both produced the same exploding phones.  And Samsung supposedly also fired all the battery engineers that made their "new design" battery.

My guess is, the current rumor seems to be the most consistent with everything that is happening and that Samsung just jumped the gun on making new innovative stuff under a strict timeline of "releasing a new Note every year" without adequate testing.

Offline Teemowork

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Re: Samsung galaxy note 7
« Reply #28 on: October 17, 2016, 11:38:21 AM »
For anyone who is remotely considering keeping their Note 7 and ignoring Samsung's official recall, then be aware you will not be allowed on any airplane back in the States (from or to).

"It is now a federal crime to bring a Galaxy Note 7 onto an airplane"
Offenders are subject to civil penalties of up to $179,933 for each violation....and imprisonment of up to ten years, or both


Public endangerment on airplanes is a big no no.

http://www.theverge.com/2016/10/16/13298846/galaxy-note-7-federal-crime-federal-aviation-administration

Offline Schellib39

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Re: Samsung galaxy note 7
« Reply #29 on: January 23, 2017, 12:59:50 PM »
"Samsung says faulty battery was main cause of Galaxy Note 7 fires"

http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/business/2017/01/23/55/0502000000AEN20170123003551320F.html

Offline maximmm

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Re: Samsung galaxy note 7
« Reply #30 on: January 23, 2017, 03:41:26 PM »
"Samsung says faulty battery was main cause of Galaxy Note 7 fires"

http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/business/2017/01/23/55/0502000000AEN20170123003551320F.html

Everyone has been saying that since the beginning. 

Samsung isn't that great with its reveals, is it?
Don't let it consume you.

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